Aspiring writer. Basically I want to work in an industry where everyone is a size 0 and not feel gross.

Height: 5'8"

HW: 234 (ew, don't look at that)
CW: 226

GW1: 211 July 4th (Gma's Bday)
GW2: 190 Aug 16th (Vineyard Party)
GW3: 181 Sept. 15th (New Job)
GW4: 171 Oct. 10th (Moving)
GW5: 151 Christmas
Then we'll see.

UGW: 131
blogilates:

This image strikes me hard. As I little girl, I was chubby, I was made fun of (having my last name didn’t help either), and I do remember turning my fingers into little scissors and wishing I could cut off my fat.

Honestly, I didn’t even know what fat was or that anything was “wrong” with me until the other kids told me so. Some days I was really terrified of going to school. I tried to distract it all by just studying harder.

It wasn’t until 7th grade when I started to get taller/skinnier and when I moved to a new school that the bullying stopped. 

This notion that “thinner is better” and that “fat is bad” gets ingrained in kids’ head from an early age…whether it’s subliminally from media or just hearing it from other family members complaining about their bodies. So it is HARD to accept your body when everyone tells you not to. Body dissatisfaction begins to take over your life and you become obsessed with changing it. And you know what? Some girls won’t know how to. That’s when the dangerous habits begin.

"Over 80 percent of 10-year-old girls are afraid of being fat. By middle school, 40-70 percent of girls are dissatisfied with two or more parts of their body, and body satisfaction hits rock bottom between the ages of 12 and 15." (NYC.gov)

So how do I like my body now that I’m a fitness instructor? There’s days when I love it and days when I hate it just like any other girl. Social media comments don’t make it any easier, but seriously if you make stupid remarks and your profile is private and you have no followers, just stop it. 

I know that at the end of the day, I am more than just my physical appearance. Seriously. My body holds my talents, my dreams, and my drive. It doesn’t define me. So don’t let it define you either. Let’s teach our little girls this. They don’t need to know that anything is wrong with their body because there isn’t. They just need to know that they should smile, work hard, and reach for their wildest dreams, whatever it may be. The change starts with this generation, now.

Thanks @fit2fat2fitwife and @fit2fat2fit for the emotional conversation yesterday.

blogilates:

This image strikes me hard. As I little girl, I was chubby, I was made fun of (having my last name didn’t help either), and I do remember turning my fingers into little scissors and wishing I could cut off my fat.

Honestly, I didn’t even know what fat was or that anything was “wrong” with me until the other kids told me so. Some days I was really terrified of going to school. I tried to distract it all by just studying harder.

It wasn’t until 7th grade when I started to get taller/skinnier and when I moved to a new school that the bullying stopped.

This notion that “thinner is better” and that “fat is bad” gets ingrained in kids’ head from an early age…whether it’s subliminally from media or just hearing it from other family members complaining about their bodies. So it is HARD to accept your body when everyone tells you not to. Body dissatisfaction begins to take over your life and you become obsessed with changing it. And you know what? Some girls won’t know how to. That’s when the dangerous habits begin.

"Over 80 percent of 10-year-old girls are afraid of being fat. By middle school, 40-70 percent of girls are dissatisfied with two or more parts of their body, and body satisfaction hits rock bottom between the ages of 12 and 15." (NYC.gov)

So how do I like my body now that I’m a fitness instructor? There’s days when I love it and days when I hate it just like any other girl. Social media comments don’t make it any easier, but seriously if you make stupid remarks and your profile is private and you have no followers, just stop it.

I know that at the end of the day, I am more than just my physical appearance. Seriously. My body holds my talents, my dreams, and my drive. It doesn’t define me. So don’t let it define you either. Let’s teach our little girls this. They don’t need to know that anything is wrong with their body because there isn’t. They just need to know that they should smile, work hard, and reach for their wildest dreams, whatever it may be. The change starts with this generation, now.

Thanks @fit2fat2fitwife and @fit2fat2fit for the emotional conversation yesterday.

cakeandrevolution:

I want to see a reality tv show where straight dudes have to read the shitty messages they send to women to their mothers.

Sunday, September 14, 2014
curvecreation:

This is only two years apart! I’m finally becoming the person I’ve always wanted to be: a fiery, curvy redhead pinup! My biggest regret is not embracing who I was because of the lack of acceptance of others. I love who I am, who I’ve become. I shouldn’t have dulled that for anyone #missi #missosiriarose #styleprogression

Yes!!!

curvecreation:

This is only two years apart! I’m finally becoming the person I’ve always wanted to be: a fiery, curvy redhead pinup! My biggest regret is not embracing who I was because of the lack of acceptance of others. I love who I am, who I’ve become. I shouldn’t have dulled that for anyone #missi #missosiriarose #styleprogression

Yes!!!

Saturday, September 13, 2014
"You have to decide what your highest priorities are and have the courage—pleasantly, smilingly, nonapologetically, to say “no” to other things. And the way you do that is by having a bigger “yes” burning inside. The enemy of the “best” is often the “good.”"
Stephen R. Covey (via gettingahealthybody)
Friday, September 12, 2014
"Falling in love with yourself first doesn’t make you vain or selfish, it makes you indestructible."
(via psych-facts)
Wednesday, September 10, 2014
 
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